Christmas tree collection on January 4, 2014

first_imgMembers of the Northern Dance Theatre Society and École Central Grade 6 French Immersion Field Trip Committee will be picking trees up between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. that day. Residents are asked to place their trees on the curb before 9 a.m., and are reminded to remove all decorations, tinsels and plastic tree bags beforehand.Trees can also be dropped off at the City’s snow removal dump site at 79 Avenue and 93 Street. The trees will be chipped and used to build the city’s walking trails.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Duo are back-up options for Spurs ahead of £50m spree – report

first_imgThe Sunday Mirror say Tottenham will make a bid for Fulham star Moussa Dembele if Porto refuse to drop their £25m asking price for Joao Moutinho.Spurs are said to have previously made an offer for Dembele and remain interested in taking him to White Hart Lane.Dembele has been linked with Spurs several times.It is claimed the north London club are planning a £50m spending spree before the transfer window closes and that Chelsea’s Raul Meireles is also among their back-up options if they are unable to land their first-choice targets.Liverpool are planning a ‘final push’ to sign Clint Dempsey from Fulham, according to The People.The American has been linked with a move to Anfield for several months but no official bid has been made.However, it is claimed manager Brendan Rodgers has told Liverpool’s owners he is determined to capture Dempsey.The Sun on Sunday say Fulham have stepped up their apparent interest in Evian’s Ivory Coast striker Yannick Sagbo, who it is claimed is rated at £3m.The Sunday Mirror suggest Sunderland manager Martin O’Neill is ­weighing up a move for Tottenham’s Michael Dawson.The defender has stalled over a transfer to QPR, who have had a bid for him accepted, and is believed to be keen to join the Black Cats.Meanwhile, out-of-favour QPR striker Jay Bothroyd has again been linked with Sheffield Wednesday.The People claim Owls boss Dave Jones, who managed Bothroyd at Cardiff, is keen to complete a deal to sign him on loan.Rangers manager Mark Hughes recently stated that no approach had been made for the player.The Sunday Mirror run a story suggesting that Bothroyd, Luke Young, DJ Campbell, Rob Hulse and Tommy Smith are unhappy with the way they have been treated at Loftus Road.Smith has moved to Cardiff and the others have been told that they too can leave the club.A source said to be close to the players is quoted as saying: “They find the way they have been treated disrespectful.“They have not been a moment’s trouble to the club. They cannot understand what is going on and why this has happened.”See also:Tottenham ready to focus on Dembele as Modric’s replacement – reportFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Photo library: Tourism and leisure 8

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Tourism & Leisure contact sheet (1.1MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Cape Town, Western Cape province: Luxury apartments look onto the marina at the V & A Waterfront, a mixed-use shopping, hotel, business and residential development set in a working harbour.Photo: Rodger BoschMediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Cape Town, Western Capeprovince: The cable car up Table Mountain.Photo: Mary Alexander, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Cape Town, Western Cape province: Hout Bay. Photo: Mary Alexander, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Cape Town, Western Cape province: The lighthouse at Cape Point. Photo: Mary Alexander, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Cape Town, Western Cape province: The Victoria and Albert Waterfront is a shopping and entertainment complex set in a working harbour. Photo: Mary Alexander, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Cape Town, Western Cape province: A view of Table Mountain from the ferry to Robben Island. Photo: Mary Alexander, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Cape Town, Western Cape province: A guard tower on Robben Island, once an infamous jail for political prisoners, most notably Nelson Mandela.Photo: Mary Alexander, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Cape Town, Western Cape province: The manor house at Groot Constantia, one of the oldest wine farms in the Cape winelands. Photo: Mary Alexander, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Cape Town, Western Cape province: The manor house at Groot Constantia, one of the oldest wine farms in the Cape winelands. Photo: Mary Alexander, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image TOURISM AND LEISURE 8:{loadposition tourism}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at [email protected]last_img read more

2019 Outstanding Market Exhibitors at the Ohio State Fair

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Allison Stacklen, 12, from Union County was the first place Outstanding Market Poultry Exhibitor. The other Poultry Outstanding Market Exhibitors were: Luke Kraft, Warren Co., 9; Sophia Preston, Fairfield Co., 10; Hailey Ballah, Madison Co., 11; Johnathan Woodward, Coshocton Co., 13; Allison Kinney, Logan Co., 14; Aiden Hester, Clinton Co., 15; Hayden Johnson, Jefferson Co., 16; Malia Jones, Licking Co., 17; and Deloris Corcoran, Ross Co., 18. Seth Wasilewski, 18, from Richland County was the first place Outstanding Market Lamb Exhibitor. The other Lamb Outstanding Market Exhibitors were: Ephriam Fowler, Guernsey Co., 9; Brynn Shearer, Wayne Co., 10; Jada Shroyer, Logan Co., 11; Nicholas Johnson, Union Co., 12; Morgan Evans, Union Co., 13; Bailee Amstutz, Union Co., 14; Hanna DeLong, Champaign Co., 15; and Tiffany Sunday, Pickaway Co., 17. Tiffany Sunday, 17, from Pickaway County was the first place Outstanding Market Goat Exhibitor. The other Goat Outstanding Market Exhibitors were: Anara Shroyer, Logan Co., 9; Julia Cowdry, Fairfield Co., 10; Briley Ashcraft, Athens Co., 11; Harley Hanes, Darke Co., 12; Jaden Snyder, Clinton Co., 13; Isaac Beal, Miami Co., 14; Jacob Prasuhn, Darke Co., 15; Ashlyn O’Brien, Wood Co., 16; and Talen Coriell, Scioto Co., 18. Alex Linder, 16, from Huron County was the first place Outstanding Market Beef Exhibitor. The other Beef Outstanding Market Exhibitors were: Kendall Bishop, Clark Co., 9; Madisyn Brandt, Tuscarawas Co., 10; Carly Sanders, Highland Co., 11; Taylor Poff, Geauga Co., 12; Sydney Sanders, Highland Co., 13; Brice Phelps, Union Co., 14; Hayden Belleville, Wood Co., 15; Allison Davis, Carroll Co., 17; and Lori Millenbaugh, Crawford Co., 18. Madelyn Harrison, 17, from Butler County was the first place Outstanding Market Barrow Exhibitor. The other Barrow Outstanding Market Exhibitors were: Tommy Hughes-Harris, Fayette Co., 9; Ava Genter, Fulton Co., 10; Cooper Stambaugh, Fulton Co., 11; Seth Fearon, Darke Co., 12; Grayden Sproull, Harrison Co., 13; Makenah Rohr, Stark Co., 14; Madelyn Fearon, Darke Co., 15; and Jenna Siegel, Marion Co., 18.last_img read more

What Exactly Is a Low-Load Home?

first_imgI found out last month that the Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) is working on a new design manual.  You certainly know of some of their other manuals:  Manual J, Manual S, Manual D, Manual T… maybe even Manual P. They have quite a few others as well (H, Zr…) but now they’re working on one that will address a part of the market we encounter more and more often.  And that would be low-load homes.ACCA put out a call for volunteers to work on the manual in the spring of this year.  (Applications were due in April, so it’s too late to apply now.)  The objectives of the new manual, at least as specified in the call for volunteers, are:Defining low-load homes’ characteristics (i.e., low infiltration, sealed-combustion appliances, ducts in conditioned space, low CFM exhaust fans, etc.).Resolving ventilation requirements (for occupant health and safety) while maintaining moisture control.Addressing ancillary dehumidification equipment for humid locations.Offering air distribution strategies for occupant comfort; especially problematic when a 2,000 square foot home (and larger) may only need one-ton of air conditioning (hence, only 400 cfm of total airflow is available). 1,500 square feet per ton of coolingAt the ASHRAE conference in Houston, I spoke with someone who’s on the task force and was told they’re defining a low-load home as a house that has a house-size-to-load ratio of 1,500 square feet per ton or greater.  That sounds about right to me.  At the low end, that means a 2,000 square foot house would need only about 16,000 BTU per hour of heating or cooling capacity. That’s an air conditioner or heat pump smaller than 1.5 ton!And that’s just the starting point for low-load homes.  We’ve done load calculations for homes that are in the 2,500 to 3,000 square feet per ton range.  (See my 2016 article with data from our results.)  Here we’re talking about a 2,000 square foot home that needs less than a ton of cooling. As the objectives above point out, heating or cooling 2,000 square feet with 400 cubic feet per minute (cfm) of air flow is a challenge.This is an important issue because manufacturers have been slow to make low-capacity equipment for low-load homes.  Yeah, I know what some of you are thinking:  Why should manufacturers make smaller equipment since low-load homes are just a tiny niche in the larger market?Condos and apartments have low loadsAh, but that’s not really true.  Low-load homes may be a tiny niche among single-family detached homes but not when you get to multifamily homes (apartments and condos).  Because of all the adiabatic walls, floors, and ceilings (i.e. parts of the building enclosure with no temperature difference and thus no heat flow across them), many multifamily dwelling units hit that low-load threshold of 1,500 s.f./ton simply by meeting code. And to make it even worse, they’re smaller and thus need smaller equipment — even when they’re not that efficient.Back in 2012, Professor John Straube gave a full-day presentation on mechanical systems for low-load homes at Building Science Corporation’s Experts’ Session.  He’s a Canadian and gave only a number for heating, but he defined a low-load home as one having a peak heating load of 15,000 to 30,000 BTU/hour. Most code-compliant multifamily dwellings would be there or lower.Homes meeting the Passive House standard have low loads, tooPassive House is the ultimate low-load home program.  They’re all about increasing the insulation and airtightness while decreasing the heat transfer through thermal bridges.  Their requirements result in homes with heating and cooling loads in the range of 2,500 to 3,000 s.f./ton.The German Passivhaus program’s peak heating load limit is 3.2 BTU/hour/s.f. Converting to s.f./(12,000 BTU/hour) yields 3,750 s.f./ton. (One ton of heating or cooling equals 12,000 BTU per hour.)  I believe the PHI peak cooling load is the same with an allowance for dehumidification. PHIUS peak load limits vary by location (since they believe one size does not fit all).  Peak heating load thresholds vary from less than 2 BTU/hour/s.f. to about 7 BTU/hour/s.f. Those numbers convert to 1,700 s.f./ton to 6,000 s.f./ton.The PHIUS peak cooling loads are specified two ways.  There’s one limit for the Passive House calculations and a different limit for the Manual J calculations.  In Anchorage, Alaska, for example, those numbers are 2.6 BTU/hour/s.f. (4,615 s.f./ton) and 3.7 BTU/hour/s.f. (3,243 s.f./ton) respectively.  In Scottsdale, Arizona, the numbers are 7.9 BTU/hour/s.f. (1,519 s.f./ton) and 11.3 BTU/hour/s.f. (1,062 s.f./ton).Here in the Atlanta area, the numbers are 4.8 BTU/hour/s.f. (2,500 s.f./ton) and 6.9 BTU/hour/s.f. (1,739 s.f./ton). (Here’s the link to the PHIUS map should you want to check it out.)Heating and cooling with minisplit heat pumpsIn our HVAC design work at Energy Vanguard, our clients often end up going with something other than conventional equipment for the homes with really low loads.  Ducted and ductless minisplit heat pumps, mostly Mitsubishi, are the standard choice in those cases. (Disclosure: Mitsubishi is an advertiser in the Energy Vanguard Blog.)In the world of green building, we talk about low-load homes a lot.  We know it’s possible.  We’ve been proving it for a long time now.  But we’ve been a small niche in the market.  With the pressures of improving energy codes, accelerating climate change, and increasing multifamily construction, low-load homes are making their presence known.  That the HVAC contractors’ trade association, ACCA, is working on a low-load homes manual proves it. Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, building science consultant, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. You can follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard. RELATED ARTICLESChoosing HVAC Equipment for an Energy-Efficient HomeHeating a Tight, Well-Insulated HouseHeating Options for a Small HomeFinally, a Right-Sized FurnaceUsing a Tankless Water Heater for Space Heat Will Minisplits Replace Forced-Air Heating and Cooling Systems?Just Two Minisplits Heat and Cool the Whole HouseMechanical Systems for Low-Load Buildingslast_img read more